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One of the Tennessee Vols’ main recruiting pitches right now is early playing time.

If a player commits to the Vols, there’s a good chance they’ll see significant playing time in Knoxville, thanks to Tennessee’s lack of depth.

But that’s not the only reason recruits are considering the Volunteers.

At least one recruit — 2023 three-star safety Jack Luttrell — believes Tennessee can win a national championship in the next several years.

In fact, that’s why Luttrell committed to the Vols.

“It’s been amazing seeing the program where it is in this first year, but that’s not why I committed here,” said Luttrell to VolQuest this week.

“The reason I’m coming to Tennessee is to win a national championship. The record they have now is not what we want. It’s positive, but my goal is to win a national championship at Tennessee.”

Luttrell’s desire to win a national championship aligns with UT head coach Josh Heupel’s vision at Tennessee.

“I promise you that we are going to embark on becoming what we’re capable of becoming as a football program day-by-day and chasing and winning championships,” said Heupel at his introductory press conference this past January.

It’s been a long time since the Vols were relevant in the national championship discussion.

Will Heupel be the coach that finally gets Tennessee back in the conversation?

Jack Luttrell certainly seems to believe that will be the case.

Featured via Brianna Paciorka/News Sentinel / USA TODAY NETWORK

History

Egyptian Phoenician aleph Semitic Greek Alpha Etruscan A Latin/ Cyrillic A Boeotian 800–700 BC Greek Uncial Latin 300 AD Uncial

The earliest certain ancestor of “A” is aleph (also written aleph), the first letter of the Phoenician alphabet,[4] which consisted entirely of consonants (for that reason, it is also called an abjad to distinguish it from a true alphabet). In turn, the ancestor of aleph may have been a pictogram of an ox head in proto-Sinaitic script[5] influenced by Egyptian hieroglyphs, styled as a triangular head with two horns extended.

When the ancient Greeks adopted the alphabet, they had no use for a letter to represent the glottal stop—the consonant sound that the letter denoted in Phoenician and other Semitic languages, and that was the first phoneme of the Phoenician pronunciation of the letter—so they used their version of the sign to represent the vowel /a/, and called it by the similar name of alpha. In the earliest Greek inscriptions after the Greek Dark Ages, dating to the 8th century BC, the letter rests upon its side, but in the Greek alphabet of later times it generally resembles the modern capital letter, although many local varieties can be distinguished by the shortening of one leg, or by the angle at which the cross line is set.

The Etruscans brought the Greek alphabet to their civilization in the Italian Peninsula and left the letter unchanged. The Romans later adopted the Etruscan alphabet to write the Latin language, and the resulting letter was preserved in the Latin alphabet that would come to be used to write many languages, including English.

Typographic variants Different

During Roman times, there were many variant forms of the letter “A”. First was the monumental or lapidary style, which was used when inscribing on stone or other “permanent” media. There was also a cursive style used for everyday or utilitarian writing, which was done on more perishable surfaces. Due to the “perishable” nature of these surfaces, there are not as many examples of this style as there are of the monumental, but there are still many surviving examples of different types of cursive, such as majuscule cursive, minuscule cursive, and semicursive minuscule. Variants also existed that were intermediate between the monumental and cursive styles. The known variants include the early semi-uncial, the uncial, and the later semi-uncial.[6]

Blackletter A Uncial A Another Blackletter A
Modern Roman A Modern Italic A Modern script A

At the end of the Roman Empire (5th century AD), several variants of the cursive minuscule developed through Western Europe. Among these were the semicursive minuscule of Italy, the Merovingian script in France, the Visigothic script in Spain, and the Insular or Anglo-Irish semi-uncial or Anglo-Saxon majuscule of Great Britain. By the 9th century, the Caroline script, which was very similar to the present-day form, was the principal form used in book-making, before the advent of the printing press. This form was derived through a combining of prior forms.[6] Road sign in Ireland, showing the Irish “Latin alpha” form of “a” in lower and upper case forms.

15th-century Italy saw the formation of the two main variants that are known today. These variants, the Italic and Roman forms, were derived from the Caroline Script version. The Italic form, also called script a, is used in most current handwriting; it consists of a circle and vertical stroke on the right (“ɑ”). This slowly developed from the fifth-century form resembling the Greek letter tau in the hands of medieval Irish and English writers.[4] The Roman form is used in most printed material; it consists of a small loop with an arc over it (“a”).[6] Both derive from the majuscule (capital) form. In Greek handwriting, it was common to join the left leg and horizontal stroke into a single loop, as demonstrated by the uncial version shown. Many fonts then made the right leg vertical. In some of these, the serif that began the right leg stroke developed into an arc, resulting in the printed form, while in others it was dropped, resulting in the modern handwritten form. Graphic designers refer to the Italic and Roman forms as “single decker a” and “double decker a” respectively.

Italic type is commonly used to mark emphasis or more generally to distinguish one part of a text from the rest (set in Roman type). There are some other cases aside from italic type where script a (“ɑ”), also called Latin alpha, is used in contrast with Latin “a” (such as in the International Phonetic Alphabet).

Use in writing systems Pronunciation of the name of the letter ⟨a⟩ in European languages, note that /a/ and /aː/ can differ phonetically between

In modern English orthography, the letter ⟨a⟩ represents at least seven different vowel sounds:

The double ⟨aa⟩ sequence does not occur in native English words, but is found in some words derived from foreign languages such as Aaron and aardvark.[7] However, ⟨a⟩ occurs in many common digraphs, all with their own sound or sounds, particularly ⟨ai⟩, ⟨au⟩, ⟨aw⟩, ⟨ay⟩, ⟨ea⟩ and ⟨oa⟩.

⟨a⟩ is the third-most-commonly used letter in English (after ⟨e⟩ and ⟨t⟩),[8] and the second most common in Spanish and French. In one study, on average, about 3.68% of letters used in English texts tend to be ⟨a⟩, while the number is 6.22% in Spanish and 3.95% in French.[8]

Definition of a

(Entry 1 of 13)

a

Definition of a (Entry 2 of 13)

a

Definition of a (Entry 3 of 13)

a

Definition of a (Entry 4 of 13)

a

Definition of a (Entry 5 of 13)

a

Definition of a (Entry 6 of 13)

a-

Definition of a- (Entry 7 of 13)

a-

Definition of a- (Entry 8 of 13)

-a-

Definition of -a- (Entry 9 of 13)

-a

Definition of -a (Entry 10 of 13)

A

Definition of A (Entry 11 of 13)

A

Definition of A (Entry 12 of 13)

Å

Definition of Å (Entry 13 of 13)

A vs. an: Usage Guide

Indefinite article

In speech and writing a is used before a consonant sound. a door a human Before a vowel sound an is usual an icicle an honor but especially in speech a is used occasionally, more often in some dialects than in others. a apple a hour a obligation Before a consonant sound represented by a vowel letter a is usual a one a union but an also occurs though less frequently now than formerly. an unique such an one Before unstressed or weakly stressed syllables with initial h both a and an are used in writing. a historic an historic In the King James Version of the Old Testament and occasionally in writing and speech an is used before h in a stressed syllable. an huntress an hundred children are an heritage of the Lord — Psalms 127:3 (King James Version)

2023 recruit believes the Tennessee Vols can win a national championship soon

It’s been a long time since the Vols were relevant in the national championship discussion.

But that’s not the only reason recruits are considering the Volunteers.

At least one recruit — 2023 three-star safety Jack Luttrell — believes Tennessee can win a national championship in the next several years.

“I promise you that we are going to embark on becoming what we’re capable of becoming as a football program day-by-day and chasing and winning championships,” said Heupel at his introductory press conference this past January.

One of the Tennessee Vols’ main recruiting pitches right now is early playing time.

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