Boston College Deferred Acceptance Rate

The Office of Undergraduate Admission admitted 2,900 students to the Boston College Class of 2021 in December, about 33 percent of a pool of 9,000. Last year’s early action acceptance rate was 32 percent, with a pool of about 8,500 applicants, marking a 5 percent increase this year in early applications.

Admitted students averaged a 33 on the ACT and a 1425 on the SAT, which was updated this year by the College Board to a 1600-point scale and a new Evidence-Based Writing and Reading section. Last year’s early action admits averaged a 33 on the ACT and a 2128 on the old 2400-point SAT.

Students were accepted from 46 states and 30 countries, with a geographic distribution that Director of Undergraduate Admission John Mahoney said is about the same as in years past. AHANA students make up about 27 percent of those admitted, compared to 28 percent last year. Mahoney said about 30 percent of high school graduates nationally are AHANA.

Admissions hopes to fill about 30 percent of the Class of 2021 with students who were accepted early action. BC uses a non-binding restrictive early action program, which means applicants may not apply to both BC and another school’s binding early decision program.

Mahoney’s office makes extensive efforts to recruit students from AHANA backgrounds, starting with buying the names of high school juniors who perform well on the PSAT. Counselors travel widely in the fall to present about BC, targeting specific schools with large AHANA populations, as well as community-based organizations, which often come to BC to tour.

“We’re working hard to increase the AHANA student application pool and ideally would like to see that percentage of AHANA students ratchet up a little each year so that we look more like the country,” Mahoney said.

Mahoney said that the updated SAT took some getting used to for longtime admissions counselors, but his team received training and concordance tables from the College Board to help smooth the transition.

Georgetown University and the University of Notre Dame, generally considered BC’s biggest competitors for applicants, released their early admissions statistics before Winter Break. At Georgetown, the early action acceptance rate was 11.9 percent from 7,822 early applicants, a record-low rate, according to The Hoya. Notre Dame accepted 24.4 percent of 6,020 early applicants. Its admission website reported that it saw a 10 percent increase in early applications over last year.

Georgetown reported an average SAT score between 710 and 770 for critical reading and 700 and 770 in math, and an average ACT score between 32 and 35. Notre Dame did not report standardized test scores. Both schools have different yield targets and class sizes from BC’s, so acceptance statistics are not necessarily directly comparable.

About 2,500 early action applicants to BC were rejected, and 3,500 were deferred to be reconsidered in the regular decision round. Mahoney said his office has an ethical obligation to reject applicants who would not be competitive in the regular decision pool. Combined with the regular decision applications received by the Jan. 1 deadline, BC has received a total of 28,500 applications to the Class of 2021, down from last year’s total of 28,900.

BC’s alumni network has hosted 45 receptions across the country for admitted students since applicants were notified, and Mahoney expects about 800 students to attend an Admitted Eagle Day on Jan. 29.

“Now we want to yield these students, and get as many of these great students to come to BC as we possibly can,” he said.

Featured by Julia Hopkins / Heights Editor

boston college deferred acceptance rate

As Boston College — a school that changed its Early policy in recent years — states on its admissions website, “Boston College received over 1,950 Early Decision 1 applications and will offer admission to 41% of our candidates. 30% of ED 1 applicants will be deferred to the Regular Decision round.

Admission

If Boston College is your unequivocal first choice, then we would urge you to consider applying through Early Decision. We expect that your academic credentials, extracurricular engagement, and personal qualities will fit the profile of currently enrolled Boston College students.

Both Early Decision options are binding. If admitted through Early Decision to Boston College, you must immediately withdraw applications to other institutions and enroll at Boston College. You will be required to submit an Enrollment Confirmation Fee to Boston College within 10 days of receiving your admission offer.

Early Decision I and II vary only in terms of the deadline to apply. For Early Decision I, you must apply by November 1 and will learn of our decision by December 15. For Early Decision II, you must apply by January 1 and will learn of our decision by February 15.

Due to the binding nature of Early Decision, you are not permitted to apply to other binding Early Decision programs. You are permitted to apply to non-restrictive Early Action programs at other institutions.

As an Early Decision applicant, in addition to submitting the Common Application and required credentials, you must complete and submit the Common Application Early Decision Agreement form. This will be signed by you, your parent/guardian, and your school counselor.

Regular Decision

If you do not have a first choice college at the time you submit your application and/or if you would like to make your college decision after considering multiple offers of admission and financial aid, we encourage you to apply through Regular Decision.

Regular Decision is a non-binding admission process and the option used by most applicants to Boston College. If you apply through Regular Decision, you will learn of our decision by April 1. You will have until May 1 to make your decision and confirm your enrollment.

Regular Decision applicants who wish to be considered for our full-tuition, merit-based scholarship through the Gabelli Presidential Scholars Program must submit an application by the priority scholarship deadline of November 1. No separate application is required. Finalists will be notified of their status, along with an official offer of admission, by February 1. All other Regular Decision applicants will receive their admission decisions by April 1.

If you submit your Regular Decision application early, but later decide that Boston College is your first-choice college, you may convert your application to Early Decision II. Please contact the admission office by January 4 to make this request. You will then need to submit the signed Common Application Early Decision Agreement form.

Is there an advantage/benefit to applying Early Decision?

Yes. Early Decision applicants are part of a much smaller pool of candidates. During the 2020-21 admission cycle, Boston College received 3,225 Early Decision applications (ED I and II combined). 39% of ED applicants were admitted, filling 48% of the Class of 2025. During Regular Decision, the remaining 52% of the class was filled from an applicant pool of nearly 37,000 applications. The admit rate for Regular Decision applicants was 17%.

Because Early Decision attracts a small, but competitive pool of candidates, the acceptance rate is higher than at Regular Decision. Early Decision allows you to demonstrate your commitment to enroll at Boston College. It also enhances our ability to enroll students interested in the Jesuit, Catholic approach to education, personal growth, and service of others.

What are the possible Early Decision outcomes?

Should you elect to apply Early Decision to Boston College, you may expect one of three outcomes: Admit, Defer, or Deny. Highly competitive candidates not admitted through Early Decision will be deferred for additional consideration in our Regular Decision round. Candidates who would not be competitive in our Regular Decision process will be denied admission. This allows them to focus their time and effort on other options for college.

Early Decision I and II

If Boston College is your unequivocal first choice, then we would urge you to consider applying through Early Decision. We expect that your academic credentials, extracurricular engagement, and personal qualities will fit the profile of currently enrolled Boston College students.

Both Early Decision options are binding. If admitted through Early Decision to Boston College, you must immediately withdraw applications to other institutions and enroll at Boston College. You will be required to submit an Enrollment Confirmation Fee to Boston College within 10 days of receiving your admission offer.

Early Decision I and II vary only in terms of the deadline to apply. For Early Decision I, you must apply by November 1 and will learn of our decision by December 15. For Early Decision II, you must apply by January 1 and will learn of our decision by February 15.

Due to the binding nature of Early Decision, you are not permitted to apply to other binding Early Decision programs. You are permitted to apply to non-restrictive Early Action programs at other institutions.

As an Early Decision applicant, in addition to submitting the Common Application and required credentials, you must complete and submit the Common Application Early Decision Agreement form. This will be signed by you, your parent/guardian, and your school counselor.

boston college deferred acceptance rate

To Apply Early or Not Apply Early?

How much does applying early help you? It depends. The key question to ask is, “Is the early admissions rate actually favorable for regular students who are not being recruited by the college?”

The myth busting reasons below will explain why applying to most Ivy League and top 15 ranked colleges early does not give your application the significant boost that most people believe it will. Scrutinizing official university data reveals that the massive, double-digit differences that people perceive between the early and regular acceptance rates actually stem from misconstrued data points. Lets start by demystifying Early Decision statistics.

2,900 Admitted Early Action to Class of 2021

Admissions hopes to fill about 30 percent of the Class of 2021 with students who were accepted early action. BC uses a non-binding restrictive early action program, which means applicants may not apply to both BC and another school’s binding early decision program.

“We’re working hard to increase the AHANA student application pool and ideally would like to see that percentage of AHANA students ratchet up a little each year so that we look more like the country,” Mahoney said.

Mahoney’s office makes extensive efforts to recruit students from AHANA backgrounds, starting with buying the names of high school juniors who perform well on the PSAT. Counselors travel widely in the fall to present about BC, targeting specific schools with large AHANA populations, as well as community-based organizations, which often come to BC to tour.

“Now we want to yield these students, and get as many of these great students to come to BC as we possibly can,” he said.

“We’re working hard to increase the AHANA student application pool and ideally would like to see that percentage of AHANA students ratchet up a little each year so that we look more like the country,” Mahoney said.

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