Villanova Deferred Acceptance Rate

At some point in your senior year, there will be a moment when your mailbox (or email inbox) holds your future, determining the location of the next four years of your life. This anticipation can quickly turn to disappointment if the letter from your top-choice colleges, to which you applied early decision, is anxiously opened, only to view the word “deferred” in place of your anticipated acceptance.

Thankfully, the college admissions game is not black and white. While a deferral is certainly not the preferred answer, nor does it indicate an acceptance, it should not be considered a rejection. A deferral from an early decision cycle refers to the decision by the school to consider your application in the regular decision cycle. In short, the school is offering you another chance at admission.

Early action deadlines are designed to offer admission to a limited number of students, in order to allow the admissions department to better plan for the upcoming regular decision cycle. This preliminary round allows the admissions team a chance to evaluate their early admits in light of their projected goals for the academic year. If their goal is to admit a well-rounded freshman class with unique perspectives, the department will need time to pause and regroup before the regular decision round begins.

The heartening news in a deferral scenario is that the school saw enough promise in the materials provided by your early application that they did not reject you outright, although it’s worth noting that some schools do move all applicants the don’t accept early into the standard pool. Either way, the potential for acceptance is still on the table, and you will be reevaluated in the regular decision cycle.

Bottom line: Your chances of eventually getting in will vary school to school, but there is still a chance you’ll get in.

Should you find yourself facing a deferral letter from your top school, follow these steps to ensure your highest chance of acceptance in their second-round of admission.

It’s possible in the case of a deferred application that the school simply wants to see more information from you before making a final decision. It is also possible that the admissions team at your dream school simply needs more time to consider your application. The good news is that they saw early promise in your application and would like to revisit it.

Research what options exist for sending additional application information. Check your school’s website for information specific to the school for deadlines pertaining to a deferral. For instance, Duke requires deferred students to submit a midyear report by February 15, meaning they want to receive an actual update on your grades and involvement before reconsidering your application.

Each school will have varying deadlines and information they will want to see from their deferred students. For instance, UNC asks simply for a self-reported midyear grade update. Visit your school’s page regarding deferral information to make sure you keep their deadline in mind while moving forward through the next steps. 15% The percentage of deferred students who are eventually accepted to Georgetown University.

Consider the silver lining of your deferral letter and seize the opportunity to revisit your college list. This is a great time to add schools you may have missed in the early round of research, discover new schools who offer EDII deadlines or regular decision deadlines you hope to meet. While your research may not lead you to a new dream school to replace your deferral school, the search may lead you to a surprising school previously overlooked.

If you choose to research schools offering EDII (or later early decision) deadlines, you should note that the majority of schools, such as George Washington University, hold their deadlines for this cycle in early January, but a select few, like Kalamazoo College, offer February deadlines.

No matter what, remain positive. A contingency plan may turn out to be the best thing that ever happened to your education. The discovery of a school with a better financial package or more robust internship program may be the best choice for you in the big picture.

Maintain your high quality grades throughout your senior year, as many colleges pay close attention to student’s senior-year grades and course load. Schools will want to see that you can handle the pressure of applying to college alongside pursuing your AP classes — it’s an indicator of your ability to handle a college schedule. Stay involved in all of the activities noted on your resume: clubs, sports, etc.

While it is important to keep in mind your school’s deadlines, make sure that you have substantial content to include in your mid-year update. Plan to include an email or letter, often called a deferral letter, in your application file to the admissions counselor presiding over your territory. Always check the school’s website before writing or emailing the letter, as they may request to see certain information or have a form through which the letter should be sent in lieu of an email.

When writing a deferral letter, make sure the content is contained within one page, and updates the school on the following information:

Check the college’s website for their instructions for allowing additional recommendations to be sent along with your update. At this point in the year, teachers are less flooded with requests for recommendations. Take this opportunity to seek out a new voice to add an opinion of your qualifications to your application.

Despite the weeks spent agonizing over supplemental essays and meticulous attention spent on the application, spend the upcoming waiting game secure in the knowledge that you have presented the best version of yourself to your top school. Now the decision is left to the admissions professionals to determine whether your talents would make a good match with the rest of the incoming freshmen class in the regular decision cycle. Your early application was responsible for getting your foot in the door, and now it is up to your mid-year update to fully open the front doors of your new home for the next four years.

Application Timelines

Application Deadline Notification Date Reply Date
Early Decision I November 1 by December 15 by January 7
Early Action November 1 by January 15 by May 1
Early Decision II January 15 by March 1 by March 15
Regular Decision January 15 by April 1 by May 1

APPLICATION CHECKLIST

The following application materials are required for all first-year students. First-year international students can find additional required application materials below.

Villanova University is a member of the Common Application. A complete application for admission will include:

  • Common Application with essay
  • Villanova Member School Section with Villanova Essays
  • Within 48 hours after your application is received, youll receive information on how to set up your Applicant Status Page to track your applications status and to ultimately view your decision.

    Villanova requires a non-refundable $80 application fee (paid via the Common Application). Eligible students with financial need may secure an application fee waiver through the Common Application, the College Board, ACT, NACAC or by completing the Villanova Application Fee Waiver request form.

    Please be aware that if you use Flywire to pay your fee, it will take a few days for us to update the checklist on your Applicant Status Page.

    When completing the Common Application, you will be asked to provide the name and email of your secondary school counselor in order for them to complete the Secondary School Report and submit to Villanova along with a copy of your official transcript. If you do not have a school counselor, a teacher or school administrator may submit the Secondary School Report and transcript on your behalf.

    Secondary School Report

    The Secondary School Report provides Villanova with an overview of your high school, including coursework and rigor.

    High School Transcript(s)

    Villanova requires an official transcript detailing your coursework and grades starting in grade nine through your most recently completed term. If you have previously attended a different high school or taken courses at a local college, please be sure to have those grades sent to us as well. They may be reported on your current high school transcript or sent on a separate transcript from that other institution.

    When completing the Common Application, you will be asked to provide the name and email of your secondary school counselor in order for them to complete a letter of recommendation on your behalf. If you do not have a school counselor, a teacher or school administrator may submit a recommendation instead.

    Villanova requires one recommendation from a secondary school teacher who has taught you during your high school career. We suggest that you ask a teacher who knows you well and can speak, in detail, about your contributions in the classroom and interactions with classmates.

    This is a requirement ONLY for:

  • Early Decision II applicants
  • Regular Decision applicants
  • Deferred Early Decision I applicants
  • Deferred Early Action applicants
  • Please ask your school counselor to submit a Mid-year Report with grades or a transcript for your first semester or first trimester of senior year as soon as they are available. This should be sent by February 8 of the year you have applied or as soon as possible thereafter.

    Villanova University is test-optional for the 2020-21 and 2021-22 Admission Cycles. Click here for more information.

    While SAT/ACT results have been a part of our application process,​​​​​ we have always taken a holistic approach to our decision making. Grades, strength of curriculum, essays, extra-curricular activities and recommendations all remain important components of our admission review. Under this policy, students may choose whether or not to submit SAT and/or ACT results for consideration when submitting their applications.

    The optional writing section of each exam are not considered and SAT Subject Tests are not required.

    Reporting Scores

    Applicants who choose to submit SAT or ACT scores may share either official or self-reported scores. Scores can be self-reported via a form on the students Applicant Status Page. Students sharing self-reported scores will not be required to submit official scores unless they are admitted and choose to enroll.

    To be considered official, scores must be sent to Villanova University directly from the testing agency (Villanovas ACT code is 3744 and SAT code is 2959). Scores are also official if listed on the students official high school transcript.

    The Admission Committee will superscore the highest subscores from the SAT and/or ACT from multiple testing dates.

    Testing Deadlines

    Early Decision I and Early Action: test scores reported by November 10 will be considered.

    Early Decision II and Regular Decision: test scores reported by January 31 will be considered.

    Applicants are not required to submit an application for financial assistance to be considered for admission. However, if you intend to apply for need-based aid, you should do so at the same time you apply for admission. Applicants must submit both the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the CSS Profile. Click here to learn more about applying for financial assistance.

    U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents

    Villanova Universitys admission process is need-blind for U.S. Citizens and permanent residents. This means that submitting an application for financial assistance will have no bearing on the admission decision.

    International Applicants

    International students are eligible to apply for the Presidential Scholarship as well as limited need-based financial assistance. Due to limited funding for international students, admission for non-U.S. citizens and permanent residents is need-aware, which means your family’s ability to pay for your education may be a factor in your admission decision. International applicants go through the same holistic review process as domestic applicants, with an application for need-based financial assistance being taken into consideration at the end of that process.

    Please Note

  • Villanova does not conduct admission interviews, nor do we consider demonstrated interest as part of our admission process.
  • It is highly recommended that applicants to the Villanova School of Business have at least one year of high school Calculus.
  • A successfully completed high school Physics course is required for applicants to the College of Engineering.
  • Fitzpatrick College of Nursing applicants are required to have successfully completed at least one year of Biology and Chemistry during high school.
  • Villanova EA Deferred Class of 2022

    D was deferred. Super scored ACT 31 gpa uw 3.7 w 4.4. Two sport varsity 3 years each Great references from teachers, counselor,coach and pastor and more. Came from nationally ranked large public hs in Illinois. Hoping she still has a chance. When will they hear?

    DD deferred VBS, 1380 SAT, 3.9 WGPA, rigorous HS, mostly Honors and AP classes, lots of sports but minimal other ECs. Disappointed…

    Btw from which school did you got deferred? I got deferred from the Business School

    @Momtofourkids are you willing to share his stats as well is what geographic region you are from (NE, etc) and if you have legacy status? My DD is looking at Nova for nursing and I would like to get an idea. What other schools did he apply to? My DD is also looking at Drexel, Creighton, Bradley, and Azusa Pacific.

    DD deferred VBS, 1380 SAT, 3.9 WGPA, rigorous HS, mostly Honors and AP classes, lots of sports but minimal other ECs. Disappointed…

    How to Increase Your Chances of Getting Into College if You’ve Been Deferred

    Early action deadlines are designed to offer admission to a limited number of students, in order to allow the admissions department to better plan for the upcoming regular decision cycle. This preliminary round allows the admissions team a chance to evaluate their early admits in light of their projected goals for the academic year. If their goal is to admit a well-rounded freshman class with unique perspectives, the department will need time to pause and regroup before the regular decision round begins.

    If you choose to research schools offering EDII (or later early decision) deadlines, you should note that the majority of schools, such as George Washington University, hold their deadlines for this cycle in early January, but a select few, like Kalamazoo College, offer February deadlines.

    Maintain your high quality grades throughout your senior year, as many colleges pay close attention to student’s senior-year grades and course load. Schools will want to see that you can handle the pressure of applying to college alongside pursuing your AP classes — it’s an indicator of your ability to handle a college schedule. Stay involved in all of the activities noted on your resume: clubs, sports, etc.

    It’s possible in the case of a deferred application that the school simply wants to see more information from you before making a final decision. It is also possible that the admissions team at your dream school simply needs more time to consider your application. The good news is that they saw early promise in your application and would like to revisit it.

    Check the college’s website for their instructions for allowing additional recommendations to be sent along with your update. At this point in the year, teachers are less flooded with requests for recommendations. Take this opportunity to seek out a new voice to add an opinion of your qualifications to your application.

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