The Disadvantages of Receiving a Psychology Degree

If you are considering psychology as a major or minor, the information in this document might be useful. It briefly describes the psychology major at Wake Forest and answers common questions about majoring in psychology.

The psychology department’s goal is to provide majors with broad exposure to basic areas of psychology, along with an in-depth understanding of the methods by which psychological research is conducted. Regardless of whether your ultimate career goal is to become an applied psychologist (e.g., clinical psychologist, counselor, social worker, or consultant), to conduct behavioral research, to become a college professor, or to enter another profession altogether (e.g., law, business, medicine), a psychology major can be useful. This is because it provides in-depth knowledge about human thought, emotion, and behavior, which is

Thus, the Wake Forest psychology department aims to provide a rigorous and stimulating undergraduate education in both content and methods of psychology. Our department, like most undergraduate liberal arts departments, emphasizes research over applied work and research is a central component of many courses. A research emphasis in an undergraduate program provides the best preparation for applied graduate work as well as a strong foundation for a wide array of jobs.

Who should consider psychology as a major? Students should consider majoring in psychology if they are interested in it and reasonably good at it. The experience in Introductory Psychology can help you to assess these two factors. If you had a sustained interest in many of the topics covered, the chances are good that you will enjoy being a psychology major. Another positive indicator is that you find psychological research interesting.

Regarding aptitude, making a grade of “A” or “B” in Introductory Psychology is a positive indicator. Students who receive a “C” in Intro Psych might find majoring in psychology more difficult than do other psychology majors. We do not encourage students who receive a grade below a “C” to major in psychology.

What is required to major (or minor) in psychology? The psychology major has a minimum of 32 hours (up to a maximum of 50 hours), which works out to 11 to 17 courses including Introductory Psychology. A minor in psychology requires 15 hours, or approximately five courses, including Introductory. A complete listing of departmental offerings and information concerning requirements for majors can be obtained in the College Bulletin, or from the Psychology Department Office.

If I am considering psychology as a major, what should I take next? We strongly recommend that anyone interested in a psychology major after the Introductory course take one more psychology elective before embarking on the required research methods courses (PSY 311 / 312). This elective can be chosen from the following list of courses which have only Introductory Psychology as a prerequisite:

*These courses are not taught on a regular basis and are not scheduled to be taught in the next few semesters.

Are there any courses I have to take at specific times? The only courses that must be taken at specific times are courses in the honors program, in which students take advanced methods classes and carry out their own research project. To complete the honors program, one cannot go abroad in the spring of the junior year or during the senior year. Furthermore, PSY 311 must be completed by fall of the junior year; therefore, although we generally recommend that majors wait to take the required Research Methods sequence (PSY 311 and 312) until their junior year, students who think they are interested in our honors program and who will be going abroad in the fall of the junior year should consider taking PSY 311 in the spring of the sophomore year.

What do psychology majors do after graduation? Our psychology majors do many different things after graduation. Not surprisingly, some majors go to graduate school in psychology or related fields (e.g., social work), with the intention of becoming practicing psychologists, counselors, researchers, consultants, or university professors. Other majors go on to professional schools in fields such as law, business, education, or medicine. Yet others enter the job market with the B.A. degree, obtaining employment in a wide variety of areas such as social or human service work, business, or research. The psychology department does several things to help its majors find and be competitive for both jobs and graduate school immediately following graduation. Sessions on career opportunities with and without a graduate degree are held every year. There is an extensive graduate school advising system within the department. Information about graduate school options and job opportunities is provided on a Blackboard site for our majors and minors and in several books that can be checked out from the psychology department office. In addition to providing information and advice, the department offers many opportunities for students to get involved in research by working in the lab of a faculty member. Regardless of whether one plans to do research in a career, research experiences provide many benefits that can strengthen both graduate school and job applications.

Conclusion If you have questions concerning psychology as a major, you may ask your psychology professor or tell someone in the psychology office (Room 415, Greene Hall) you would like to speak to one of our psychology majors or to any other person on our staff. To declare a major in psychology, please email [email protected]

Many Jobs Can Be High Stress

Psychologists face stress from a variety of sources. Deadlines, irregular hours, mountains of paperwork, and clients dealing with major life crises are just a few of the things that might put a drain on your emotions. 2 Good stress management skills are essential.

What NO ONE tells you about majoring in PSYCHOLOGY

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why psychology is not a good major

The surprising truth about psychology careers.

Psychology is one of the most popular undergraduate majors in the United States. Yet, many people (including many parents) ask college students (and faculty) the question: “What are you going to do with a psychology major?” Let’s look at the career potential the field of psychology offers.

First, and most importantly, to actually work as a psychologist requires a graduate degree—Masters or Ph.D./Psy.D.—with 1 to 4+ years of additional education and training. Yet less than half those who graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in psychology go on to complete graduate degrees. Let’s look first at those who DO get graduate degrees and the prospects for employment and income. We will return later to students who graduate with a psychology degree, but don’t go on to become psychologists.

Clearly, the most common career path for psychology majors is clinical and counseling psychology. This is also the area of psychology that most people are aware of, primarily due to depictions of clinical psychologists and counselors in films, television, or because they or someone they know has undergone counseling/therapy.

Yet, there are many other areas of specialization in the broad field of psychology, and many of these offer good career opportunities. The problem is that the general public knows little about the areas of psychological specialization except for clinical/counseling psychology. [Here is a very good website that suggests possible career opportunities for psychology students with all levels of degree, from Bachelor’s to Ph.D.].

I was inspired to write this post when I came across a recently published children’s book, My Mommy is an Organizational Psychologist, written by Sevelyn J. Crosby and illustrated by a psychology graduate student, Blake A. Beckmann. Because my areas of expertise are industrial/organizational psychology and social psychology, I often find it hard to explain what I do career-wise to family, friends, and others. This book helps explain this area of specialization in a way that even a first-grader could understand it. Interestingly, organizational psychology is the highest-paying area for psychologists with Ph.D.s, and it is a rapidly-growing field. [See more about that here].

So, let me set the record straight about the real career opportunities available to those who study and major in psychology: It only seems as if career options are limited, but if one looks broadly at possible career paths, they are many and varied. The American Psychological Association (APA) maintains an entire area of its website specifically for exploring career opportunities with a psychology degree—at the doctoral, Masters, and even the bachelor’s degree level.

Finally, there is more to studying psychology than a lucrative career. Here is a post on the ways that studying psychology (and reading PT blogs) can change your life!

Follow me on Twitter: twitter.com/ronriggio

Are there any courses I have to take at specific times? The only courses that must be taken at specific times are courses in the honors program, in which students take advanced methods classes and carry out their own research project. To complete the honors program, one cannot go abroad in the spring of the junior year or during the senior year. Furthermore, PSY 311 must be completed by fall of the junior year; therefore, although we generally recommend that majors wait to take the required Research Methods sequence (PSY 311 and 312) until their junior year, students who think they are interested in our honors program and who will be going abroad in the fall of the junior year should consider taking PSY 311 in the spring of the sophomore year.

*These courses are not taught on a regular basis and are not scheduled to be taught in the next few semesters.

What is required to major (or minor) in psychology? The psychology major has a minimum of 32 hours (up to a maximum of 50 hours), which works out to 11 to 17 courses including Introductory Psychology. A minor in psychology requires 15 hours, or approximately five courses, including Introductory. A complete listing of departmental offerings and information concerning requirements for majors can be obtained in the College Bulletin, or from the Psychology Department Office.

Regarding aptitude, making a grade of “A” or “B” in Introductory Psychology is a positive indicator. Students who receive a “C” in Intro Psych might find majoring in psychology more difficult than do other psychology majors. We do not encourage students who receive a grade below a “C” to major in psychology.

What do psychology majors do after graduation? Our psychology majors do many different things after graduation. Not surprisingly, some majors go to graduate school in psychology or related fields (e.g., social work), with the intention of becoming practicing psychologists, counselors, researchers, consultants, or university professors. Other majors go on to professional schools in fields such as law, business, education, or medicine. Yet others enter the job market with the B.A. degree, obtaining employment in a wide variety of areas such as social or human service work, business, or research. The psychology department does several things to help its majors find and be competitive for both jobs and graduate school immediately following graduation. Sessions on career opportunities with and without a graduate degree are held every year. There is an extensive graduate school advising system within the department. Information about graduate school options and job opportunities is provided on a Blackboard site for our majors and minors and in several books that can be checked out from the psychology department office. In addition to providing information and advice, the department offers many opportunities for students to get involved in research by working in the lab of a faculty member. Regardless of whether one plans to do research in a career, research experiences provide many benefits that can strengthen both graduate school and job applications.

FAQ

Do you regret majoring in psychology?

77% of psychology majors said they had regrets.

Is majoring in psychology worth it?

The Disadvantages of Being a Psychologist
  • Extensive Education and Training. Most psychologists spend many years in higher education. …
  • Evening and Weekend Hours. …
  • Possibility of Patient Violence. …
  • Isolation in Practice. …
  • Emotional Strain. …
  • Working with Children.

Is psychology a difficult major?

For psychologists and mental health professionals, the outlook is favorable at an expected 14% growth rate through 2028. Earning a psychology degree now and continuing on to graduate work can set you up for a steady career in a growing job market.

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